Been A Little Quiet

The new job and some other issues have kept me a bit away from my crafting and upcycling. Also, I think I just needed a little break.

This past weekend took us to Witchita to pick up some items from an online auction and we made a day of it – me and The Kid. Its about a three and a half hour drive from our home, so once there, we explored the city a little and had a picnic lunch at a nearby lake and state park. It was gorgeous! The temperature couldn’t have been nicer if I could have made a wish and with a slight breeze blowing it was heavenly. We had a quasi-water ski show with a couple who just spent their time skiing back and forth on our shore… we were quite entertained by the show – especially when he fell!

So, a few things that we picked up that I thought I would share with you:

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This was the biggest treasure… with a little work, the plan is to put this in my living room. I love the care and attention that went into building furniture 50, 60, 70 or more years ago. It is why I will only work with all wood pieces, I would hate to to think that work I did wouldn’t last because the basic structure of the furniture wasn’t sound or high quality. This shouldn’t need much work, just replacing some of the missing veneer, and thankfully, I have managed to collect a good chunk from pieces I have worked on it the past. Then a sanding and re-stain. And the little drawer needs to be re-assembled, but nothing major.

Other pieces were just more cut glassware and then this really interesting framed doily in the shape of a peacock and embroidered. I love unique stuff like this… I am planning on finding wall space for it in my sewing room.

510-1Here is a photo of my cut glass find… to add to my ever growing collection:

480-1The plate itself is not my pattern(s) but I have become obsessed with the cut glass/crystal stuff lately. Don’t know what I am going to do with it, but I will figure out something!

Thanks for stopping by!

julie

A New Twist To An Old Dresser

Welcome back folks! And Happy New Year!

Today I am presenting a rescued dresser (or chest of drawers… not sure what the difference really is). I did something of this nature years ago with trunks and it was a huge success. I remember one of the last ones to be completed was a present for my niece, about 3 at the time – she is now over 20! But it seemed a good time to resurrect an old tried and true technique.

I picked up an old dresser that, in its heyday, must have been absolutely beautiful. But it had obvious signs of living in an atmosphere of dampness and as a consequence, most of its beautiful veneer was peeling away. This piece had some heavy duty damage, but luckily, the bones were still solid. And the price was right… two things I look for when rescuing a piece of wood furniture.3J23p53H55G25H75Jcccdaf7f97ae0dd41ca1

As you can see from the photo – this was the photo used to list it on Craigslist – this piece was a hurting. I think the graininess of the photo helps to hide just how much was damaged to the surface of this piece. But I liked it size, so home it went with me.

The first order of business was to start removing the warped pieces of veneer. I had hoped to be able to recover some of it, but as I worked it was becoming obvious that the majority of it was not going to be salvageable. It was then that it dawned on me that this piece would need a real creative solution to rescue it. And that is when I remembered the the trunks that I had done back in the 90’s. I would clean the trunk down, line the interior with fabric and then spray paint the metal frame. Using a coordinating fabric, I would then glue using a process much like decoupage. It was a labor of love and I really loved them for the decorative storage that they provided. And the trunks were generally very affordable. Here is one of the only remaining trunks that I still have. Most of them were given away and many were sold when we made the move from California to Missouri:

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So, this process is one that I thought I might be able to replicate on this dresser. Since all the veneer was essentially stripped, I knew it would call for extreme measures for covering the surface. This surface – sans veneer – was pretty rough and wasn’t looking forward to all the filling and sanding that it would require and then still not be sure how it would come out.

In my early days of dresser restoration and the excitement of the ombr√© painting style, I used two dressers that I had previously had in my guest bedroom. In the back of my mind I know I have to replace at least one of those pieces eventually, as a huge pile of stuff that had been stored in those dressers seems to be either migrating or replicating (or both!) on the floor of that room. They need to be tucked away gently, away from sight. Knowing this I rationalized that if this process didn’t work out well enough, it could just get tucked away in the corner of the guest room and no one would be the wiser.

So off to my favorite fabric store for inspiration. It didn’t take long. Essentially, the guest bedroom is decorating in white with cobalt blue accents. Above the window, I built a shelf curtain hanger that displays a respectable collection of blue bottles – large and small. And the first fabric I saw was this gorgeous geometric pattern of blue and white!

The pattern is actually called “parterre” which is a formal garden construction on a level surface consisting of planting beds, edged in stone or tightly clipped hedging, and gravel paths arranged to form a pleasing, usually symmetrical pattern. And that lends its name to this fabric design:

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I did do a quick look around, but nothing could even begin to measure up to this. My first instinct is usually right, I like to go with my gut. So, two yards later I was heading to Home Depot for matching paint. Its difficult to match paint to fabric and my first selection (and two coats of it on the dresser) before I decided to get the slightly darker shade and repaint the whole thing. It was a good choice.

So once I painted all the surfaces that I expected to show, I used a slightly watered down mixture of Elmer’s white glue and water to adhere the fabric to the sides of the dresser and the fronts of all the drawers. To get the fabric on the drawers to match up with the sides, I put the drawers in, and placed one long, narrow strip of glue on the front of each drawer. I then wrapped the fabric around and secured it on both sides.¬† Waited for it to dry and then carefully cut the fabric along each side to release the drawers. Then it was just a matter of gluing and trimming to get everything just right. A touch up here and there and viola!, it’s completed.

So, here it is:

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I think I forgot to mention that the bottom drawer is a cedar drawer… the bottom and three sides are made of cedar and it smells so good. Its a nice little extra!

And so you don’t have to scroll up and down, here is a ‘Before & After’ picture:

Delft Dresser B&A

I don’t know if you noticed the ‘other project’ in one of the pictures above, I always have at least a couple or ten projects going on at all times! LOL

Well, thanks for stopping by! And as always, Keep Crafting Y’All!!

julie

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